Due to recent organizational restructuring and an impending parental leave, APEGS is seeking two experienced communications and public relations professionals to join the team. You will contribute to developing and maintaining the reputation of APEGS as a sound, professional regulator of the engineering and geoscience professions in Saskatchewan. The outputs you produce will be relied on, seen, and utilized by internal employees, applicants, over 15,000 APEGS registrants, and external stakeholders, with the overall regulatory purpose of protecting the public.

One position is suited perfectly for a seasoned communications professional seeking a short-term (16 to 18 month) opportunity to make a meaningful difference by building, modernizing and implementing impactful strategies.

The second position is a permanent, full-time position. It comes with all the benefits of the temporary position and will be of interest to professionals seeking a new opportunity to play a vital long-term role in bringing a multi-year strategic communications plan to life.

Your qualifications and experience will align with a market-competitive salary range that starts at $78,000, supplemented with a comprehensive benefits program as part of the APEGS Total Rewards offering. Both positions report to the Director of Communications and Public Relations.

Qualifications include:

  • Diploma or undergraduate degree in journalism, public relations, English or an equivalent combination of education and experience
  • Three to five years progressive, broad-range experience as a strong, solid generalist that is keen to lean on external third parties for highly specialized skill sets when needed
  • Highly developed writing and editing skills, with proven ability to create customized pieces of work for a wide array of audiences

See the link below for a complete description of the position, the minimum qualifications, and desired competencies.

Communications and Public Relations Specialist

To Apply:

You will be joining a dedicated team that is navigating through an exciting era of business transformation within a self-regulatory framework. APEGS employees work onsite at the APEGS office in Regina. In addition to an office location surrounded by too many amenities to name, APEGS offers employees a competitive salary and total rewards program which includes: Employer-paid benefits, paid vacation time, paid sick leave, an employee family assistance program, continuous learning and development opportunities, and financial support for pursuing further education or credentials. We also foster fun and comradery, including initiatives organized through our staff-led social committee.

Please submit a cover letter outlining how your combined experience, education and talents align with the position, together with your resume to:  hr@Apegs.ca by 5:00pm (CST) March 18, 2024.

APEGS is committed to supporting accessibility and diversity. Requests for accommodations can be made at any stage of the recruitment and selection process. If you are selected by APEGS as a candidate for the position, please make your requirements known at the time we contact you.

What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

I grew up in the Regina, SK area (White City), as the middle child in a large family of six kids. I’m recently married (to an engineer) and still live in the Regina area. I attended Greenall High School in Balgonie and graduated in 2011.

Why did you choose engineering and what is your area of specialty?

I was always interested in technology, especially software and electronics. Engineering seemed like a natural choice to me. I think I was particularly drawn to the design aspects and the chance to problem-solve as a career.

Where and when did you study engineering/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

I attended the University of Regina (2011-2016) in the Electronic Systems Engineering (ESE) program. This program was a great fit for my interests with its combination of electrical/electronics and software systems design. I felt this program set me up for careers in a variety of industries. I also participated in the engineering co-op program which was very valuable for getting some initial work experience. One of my co-op positions led to my first post-graduate engineering role which I am grateful for.

What jobs/roles have you held as an engineer?

After graduating from university, I began my career as an Engineer-in-Training at SaskEnergy. I worked in the SCADA and automation field and gained experience designing, testing, and commissioning PLC control and software HMI systems. I enjoyed applying both the hardware and software aspects of my ESE education in this role, and having the opportunity for on-site work was rewarding.

In 2018, I left my position at SaskEnergy and co-founded a software medical device company (Limbus AI) alongside my brother Dr. Joshua Giambattista, a radiation oncologist, Carter Kolbeck, another University of Regina ESE grad, and Dr. Karl Otto, an experienced innovator and medical physicist in the radiation therapy field. We set out to develop software technology that uses machine learning to improve the efficiency of organ contouring in planning cancer radiation treatments. Since 2018 we have developed our technology and grown to deploy our software medical device in hundreds of hospitals and cancer clinics worldwide.

I obtained my P.Eng. in 2020, and today I oversee product development and regulatory compliance at Limbus AI. I manage a team of staff ranging from quality management and regulatory affairs to other engineers and computer scientists. My work involves software design and development, application of international standards relating to medical device development, risk management, cybersecurity, and verification and validation. Quite the departure from my initial experience in the utility industry, but a chance to apply my education and past experience in software and electronics and design in a new and exciting field.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

While I’ve had a relatively short career so far, I am grateful I chose engineering as a career. It’s provided great opportunities to do something I really like, freedom in the industry of work and companies to work for, and rewarding daily experiences.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

I stay active playing soccer and golfing in the summer, and I like to participate where I can in Regina’s growing local technology startup community (through Conexus Cultivator). I lend my time to mentor other startup founders (many of them engineers) and it’s great to be able to pass along some of the knowledge I have and be involved in this local community.

Mark your calendars! APEGS is excited to announce the 2024 Spring Professional Development Days. As part of the Spring PD Days, APEGS is offering registrants the below two workshops:

Business Analytics for Engineers, Geoscientists and Managers
March 1, 2024
DoubleTree Hotel – 1975 Broad Street, Regina, SK
Click here for more information and to register.

Get to the Point! A Technical Writing Course for Business and Technical Professionals
March 4-5, 2024
DoubleTree Hotel – 1975 Broad Street, Regina, SK
Click here for more information and to register.

Celebrate Engineering and Geoscience Week by attending the APEGS Awards Banquet. The awards highlight Saskatchewan engineers and geoscientists for their contributions to the public and the professions. They showcase and recognize exemplary competence and conduct to foster professional excellence among members, inspire the next generation of professionals, and raise awareness of the role of engineers, geoscientists, and APEGS to protect the public.

Seven awards will be presented at the banquet as part of Engineering and Geoscience Week, which is March 3 to 9, 2024. This year’s award recipients are listed below:

Brian Eckel Distinguished Service – Dr. Terrance (Terry) Fonstad, P.Eng., P.Ag., FEC, FGC (Hon)
An honour given only to those who truly exemplify the best standards of engineering and geoscience in Saskatchewan.

Outstanding Achievement Award – Dr. Philip LePoudre, P.Eng.
Honours members who show technical excellence and achievement in engineering and/or geoscience in Saskatchewan.

McCannel Award – Sumith Kahanda, P.Eng.
Honours service to APEGS, and to the Professions as a whole.

Exceptional Engineering/Geoscience Project Award – RMD Engineering – Emergency Use Ventilators
Recognizes accomplishments in engineering and/or geoscience.

Environmental Excellence Award – Aquistore by Petroleum Technology Research Centre
Recognizes the exceptional achievements by an individual or team related to environmental protection and preservation.

Promising Member Award – Jenae Nixon, P.Eng.
Recognize exceptional achievements by a professional member in the early stages of his/her career in Saskatchewan.

Friend of the Professions Award – Dr. Dominique Turcotte
Recognizes exceptional achievements or unique contributions by a non-member in the promotion of the professions.

Click here for more information and to register.

APEGS is always striving to be a better regulator. In December 2023 APEGS Council approved new policies regarding how academic and experience qualifications are assessed for professional registration. The changes came into effect January 1, 2024 and are aimed at ensuring fair, transparent, and timely processes, while maintaining admissions standards to protect the public. We aim to achieve a level of regulation that is both sufficient and necessary to protect the public.

APEGS will be using a confidence-based approach to both academic and experience assessment processes. In cases where APEGS has high confidence that the applicant meets the requirements to practice safely in the public interest, the review will be limited. In cases where APEGS has low confidence, the review will be more rigorous. Detailed assessments will be undertaken by professional staff, with oversight and auditing of their work by volunteer assessors and the academic and experience review committees.

These changes will affect you if you are, or are applying as, a member in training and you do not have a Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) accredited engineering degree or a Canadian four-year Bachelor of Science degree in geoscience. Below is a summary of the most notable changes. For more details see the website. Relevant links are provided below.

For member in training applicants:

  • Any applicant that APEGS deems to be missing one or more years of full-time equivalent university level engineering/geoscience education will not be eligible for an academic assessment and their application will be denied. They may be deemed to meet the academic requirement for engineering/geoscience licensee, as appropriate.
  • Only four years of acceptable experience is required to qualify for the experience option to try and get confirmatory exams waived.
  • Any applicant who APEGS deems to have a four-year bachelor’s degree in engineering or geoscience at a comparable level to a Canadian one, and at least 10 years of acceptable engineering/geoscience experience, will be given the option to have a full competency assessment of their work experience prior to an academic assessment. If all the experience requirements are met, a detailed academic assessment will not be required. See website for details https://www.apegs.ca/apply/how-to-apply/engineer-in-training/academic-assessment

For work experience reporting:

  • Submission Quality Checks
    • Professional staff will be doing a quality check on all competency-based assessment submissions. If the quality check is not passed applicants will receive a notification of the shortcomings and be required to redo their self-assessment, including validations before the submission will be formally assessed. See the APEGS website for details https://www.apegs.ca/apply/how-to-apply/work-experience-reporting.

Introducing new Public Appointee, John Breakey!

John joined APEGS a month ago serving on the Discipline Committee. The role of public appointees is to represent the public in the self-regulation of the professions of engineering and geoscience by bringing an external viewpoint and transparency to the governance and regulation of the professions. They are appointed according to The Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act by a Lieutenant Governor Order in Council upon recommendation of the minister responsible for the act.

John has spent the last 30 years in the energy industry, primarily in land negotiation and acquisition for oil and gas. He was also a major shareholder in a corporate farm operation. His interests include fishing, hunting, and spending time outdoors with family.

As a member of the Discipline Committee, John offers an independent voice to the discussions and decisions of the committee. “It is important to have a public appointee to bring a fresh set of eyes to the ever-important task of maintaining safety for the public,” said John.

John attended his first council meeting with APEGS at the beginning of December. About his experience, John said, “The participants show a high degree of professionalism with a strong desire to maintain the same going forward.” John hopes that through his business and work experience he’ll be able to make meaningful contributions to APEGS.

In November, the Government of Alberta proposed act changes that will enable technology companies and workers to use the title “Software Engineer” without holding a professional engineering licence from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Alberta.

In Saskatchewan, like the acts in all the other provinces and territories, The Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act only allows professionals licensed by APEGS to use the title “Software Engineer,” “Computer Engineer,” and related titles that prefix “Engineer” with IT-related disciplines and practices.

It is important for the public to understand that, in Saskatchewan, only licensed professionals have the qualifications, competence, and ethics to practice engineering in the public interest, and only they can use the title “Engineer”. Allowing others to use the title without being licensed confuses the public over who is allowed to call themselves a professional engineer, and therefore, who is qualified to protect the public and be held accountable for the work they do.

As APEGS continues through the process of proposing other act and bylaw changes, it will uphold the necessity to restrict the title and practice of engineering.

What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

I was born in Tehran capital of Iran, and I have been living there up until now. I have a son who lived in Canada (B.C.) with his mother for a while. I also have a sister and two brothers, and my parents live near me.

Why did you choose engineering and what is your area of specialty?

One of the main reasons why I decided to become an engineer was the relationship between the worlds of mathematics and engineering. This gives me the opportunity to solve problems and design things that really matter. Also, it helps me apply my mathematical talents to find innovative solutions. I have been working as a civil and geotechnical engineer in research, construction, and consulting practice for the past 20 years.

Where and when did you study engineering/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

My highest academic degree certification is a Ph.D. in civil engineering-geotechnical with honours. Having held senior engineering and management positions in civil industry in Iran, I have long experience in detailed investigation and civil engineering studies associated with structure and infrastructure projects.

What jobs/roles have you held as an engineer?

In addition to APEGS licensure, I hold the highest engineering practice certification in execution, supervision, and design in Iran. Site supervisor, civil and geotechnical engineering specialist, researcher,  and project manager are included in my previous responsibilities. From an academic view, my research has concentrated on continuum mechanics, constitutive models, computational modelling, and experimental studies.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

I believe my career has had a positive impact on the company’s performance as a whole. Both my manager and co-workers appreciate my attempts and especially admire my developing research. My passion for innovation and technology has led me to incorporate machine learning and deep learning into my work, bringing a fresh perspective to the industry.

Who has inspired or mentored you in your career? What insight or wisdom did they impart?

I have been working as a civil and geotechnical engineer in research, construction, and consulting practice from 2002 to 2023, and for the last decade, I have tried my best to stay connected with this area of university. In this way, both my late Prof. Sadrnejad and my Ph.D. supervisor Prof. Noorzad have greatly inspired me. I have also always been inspired by my parents. This caused me to try my best to enrich my scientific role as an engineer and researcher. For example, in one of my studies in the geotechnical field, I was encouraged to provide a triaxial apparatus with a suction control mechanism to fulfill the experimental part of my study. Sometimes providing laboratory instruments can be tough work in my field of practice; however, I am used to fulfilling the work assigned to me and trying my best to remedy the defects by myself.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

I commonly exercise and go to the gym. As a member of a small charity group, I help people and patients in need. My contribution in editing scientific manuscripts, reviewing papers and other similar activities are parts of what I do in my free time.

Anything else you want to say?

I believe that we should move on the border of knowledge at the same time as executive work. This important issue not only helps us to fulfill the assigned duties in the best way but also increases our passion to create innovation and acquire updated knowledge. As an example, in my recent research, we have been trying to train a model through a deep learning algorithm based on neural network architecture. With this method, we have tried to utilize Generative Artificial Intelligence as a substitute for traditional machine learning algorithms. In this way, we can be sure that the quality of the work and services will be enriched.

What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

Originally from Egypt, specifically Alexandria, I had the privilege of growing up in a coastal city. Growing up by the ocean, with its endless horizon symbolizing unlimited possibilities, has profoundly shaped my perspective on life and career. This experience has significantly influenced my life and aspirations, teaching me to embrace challenges with a sense of adventure and to approach my career with a mindset of endless possibilities and growth.

Why did you choose engineering and what is your area of specialty?

Several experiences sparked my interest in chemical engineering. My dad was a chemist, my brother was an engineer, and most of my family members were either chemists or engineers. I was inspired by their experiences, and I wanted to combine both fields as a chemical engineer to gain a broader vision. I was interested in making a real impact and becoming the kind of engineer that the world needs. I was particularly interested in exploring critical problems and synthesizing new materials, especially for the biomedical field.

Where and when did you study engineering/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

I earned my Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Chemical Engineering from Alexandria University in Egypt. Following that, I pursued my Master of Science (M.S.) in Chemical Engineering at Kuwait University, where I achieved an exceptional cumulative GPA of 4.00/4.00. Subsequently, I completed my Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Chemical Engineering at Ryerson University (currently Toronto Metropolitan University) in Toronto, Canada, with an outstanding cumulative GPA of 4.33/4.33. My Ph.D. thesis focused on membrane science and technology. Each of these educational experiences has been instrumental in expanding my knowledge, skills, and career. I particularly cherish my undergraduate experience in Egypt, as it provided a comprehensive fundamental program that equipped me with the essential knowledge I continue to apply in my work. I am deeply proud of my PhD, which holds a special place in my heart due to its significant impact. My academic journey was marked by notable achievements, including the prestigious Governor General Gold Medal, the most prestigious academic honour in Canada, and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award in recognition of my exceptional research contributions.

What jobs/roles have you held as an engineer?

I’ve had the privilege of holding various engineering roles and gaining exposure to diverse experiences in different countries, including Egypt, Kuwait, and Canada. I’ve worked in both academic and industry settings, which have provided me with a unique blend of experiences. In the academic environment, I actively engaged in teaching, research, academic activities, and collaborative projects that utilized different software and advanced technologies. In industry, I gained significant experience as both a product development engineer and a polymer process engineer, with a primary focus on research and development, material sciences, and nanotechnology. These diverse experiences have equipped me with a broad skill set and a profound understanding of engineering principles.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

I’ve appreciated several aspects of my career opportunities and experiences, but one that stands out the most is my ability to contribute to problem-solving. The most rewarding facet of my work, particularly in research, is the direct impact it has on improving the lives of individuals, especially kidney failure patients. It’s an incredible privilege to be part of the efforts to find solutions to critical health problems. Knowing that the research and work I do may help enhance the quality of life and potentially save lives is both motivating and inspiring. This sense of purpose has been a driving force throughout my career, and it’s deeply gratifying to see how our contributions can make a significant difference in the lives of those who need it most. This appreciation for the real-world impact of my work continues to inspire me in my professional journey.

Who has inspired or mentored you in your career? What insight or wisdom did they impart?

Throughout my career, I’ve been fortunate to have the support and guidance of great mentors in the field of chemical engineering. These mentors have provided me with invaluable insights and wisdom that have profoundly shaped my career path. Their continued mentorship has been instrumental in my professional growth, and I deeply value the ongoing support that I always receive from my mentors who believe that learning doesn’t end with a degree. This belief has driven me to launch and chair a Women in Engineering chapter in 2018 to promote and support the success of female undergraduate and graduate chemical engineering students at the University of Saskatchewan.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

What I enjoy the most is my time with my kids and the fun we have together. These moments not only provide a break from the demands of work but also serve as a source of inspiration and motivation to recharge my positive energy.

Anything else you want to say?

In closing, I’d like to add that I’m incredibly proud of my journey as an engineer. Throughout the years, I’ve had the privilege of working on projects that have not only expanded my technical expertise but have also allowed me to contribute to meaningful solutions especially when it comes to helping kidney failure patients. Looking ahead, my aspirations as an engineer in my research program are boundless. I’m passionate about staying at the forefront of innovation within my field and continually pushing the boundaries of what’s possible. My ultimate goal is to create an artificial wearable kidney based on filters compatible with the body to help kidney failure patients and solve dialysis problems.

APEGS is engaging in a review of the Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act and associated bylaws. The act and bylaws have not been reviewed since 1997. Review is important to help us regulate the professions more effectively. With the introduction of the Labour Mobility and Fair Registration Practices Act in May 2022, the time is right to evolve our processes and increase our responsiveness.

We are not alone. Other provincial professional regulators in Saskatchewan and engineering and geoscience regulators throughout Canada have gone or are going through the same changes as APEGS.

Themes of Change

  1. Simplify: Move specifics from the act to bylaws and procedures
  2. Modernize Terminology: Use terminology that is inclusive and easily understood by the public and reflects our role as a regulator.
  3. Expand Entity Regulation: Give APEGS scope to audit and enforce standards of practice and investigate and discipline business entities, in addition to individual registrants.
  4. Increase Public Representation and Accountability: Increase involvement of public representatives in the governance of APEGS and enhance our accountability to the public.
  5. Modernize Registration Framework: Ensure registration categories and processes reflect current public expectations of inclusivity, fairness, transparency and timeliness.
  6. Improve Efficiency, Effectiveness and Transparency of Governance Processes: Improve the ability for the council to represent members and maintain strategic oversight, while empowering the executive director and registrar to manage operations through a cohesive bylaw and policy framework, ensuring that the public understands what APEGS is doing to regulate in their best interest.
  7. Investigation and Discipline Transparency: Improve transparency of processes and provide clarity on roles of APEGS, council, and public. (Potentially develop an appeals committee separate from council.)

Schedule

September 2023 to November 2023 – Review the act and bylaws and note desired changes, consulting with the Minister in the process

December 2023 – Provide Minister with draft amendments

January 2024 to May 2024 – Work with Minister to develop the draft legislative proposal

May 2024 to December 2024 –Stakeholder engagement

January 2025 to August 2025 – Prepare decision item for cabinet approval

September 2025 to December 2025 – Introduce bill through to royal assent

Commitment to Ongoing Communication

The task group will keep momentum and continue with our original thinking of reviewing and recommending changes and pass along to government to carry out their legislative process.

Watch for updates on progress through outreach channels: The Edge Monthly e-newsletter (emailed on the 15th of each month or next business day), The Professional Edge print magazine (mailed in June and December).

We are now accepting applications from members to be considered for council. Nominees are confirmed by January, announced in February for the election process, and inducted at the annual meeting on May 4, 2024. If you’re interested, please visit our website to learn more about the competencies, skills, and diversity APEGS is seeking. You can apply to be considered for nomination by completing the application form by December 1 at 5:00 PM.

To learn more about the election process and what it means to serve on council, join us on October 24 for a 1-hour Teams meeting. To register, email SharonEvaniew@apegs.ca by noon on October 23. Virtual login information will be provided after registering.

LEARN MORE – https://www.apegs.ca/about/apegs-governance/council-elections


What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

I grew up in the town of Kindersley, SK, with my three sisters (one older, my twin, and one younger), and that’s where I graduated from high school in 2009. As I finished high school, engineering seemed like it would be a great fit for me as I had always enjoyed math and science and I had an interest in oil and gas because my dad had worked in the industry for years.

Why did you choose engineering and what is your area of specialty?

I originally entered engineering in 2009, but I was slightly intimidated by the program and all the changes that came with moving away from home. I switched to arts and science for a year, and then went and gained experience working in civil construction as a labourer and heavy equipment operator in Hardisty and Fort McMurray, AB. These experiences solidified my decision to return to school and pursue an engineering degree.

Where and when did you study engineering/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

I studied at the University of Saskatchewan and graduated from the Chemical Engineering program in 2016 with a petroleum specialty. I found the program to be challenging, but going back as a mature student was advantageous and I had developed the time management skills and focus required to complete the degree.

What jobs/roles have you held as an engineer?

I always imagined myself working in the oil and gas industry. As a student, I had completed two summer terms with ARC Resources in Calgary, AB, but the year I graduated, the industry was at a low and jobs were hard to come by. I took a role as a project coordinator with Graham Construction in Saskatoon within their industrial division where I gained experience in project management, quality control, safety, and estimating. After working a few years at Graham, I was looking for a change where I would be able to develop my design skills, which led me to work for Delco Water as a project engineer.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

I have been with Delco Water for four years now, where I have also gained experience in a leadership role as the Engineering Manager. I never imagined myself working in the water industry, but I have grown to love the work and challenges associated with it. I have learned there are so many unique opportunities available for engineers, the sky is really the limit.

Who has inspired or mentored you in your career? What insight or wisdom did they impart?

Grant (Ryan) Guenther, the Chief Engineer at Delco Water has mentored me since my first day at Delco. It was his way of coaching and mentoring me that instilled my passion for the work we do. I have had many other great mentors along the way who have believed in my potential, and I am forever grateful for the opportunities I have been provided.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

In my spare time, I enjoy spending time with my family and friends, golfing, curling, and spreading mental health and suicide prevention awareness through my business and non-profit (The Life is Worth Living Way/Life is Worth Living Foundation). I am currently enjoying being on maternity leave with our son, Jack, and I am soaking in all the cuddles and enjoying watching him learn and grow.

Registration is open from October 5 to November 10, 2023. Go to the link below for information and to register.

Registration is open from September 13 to October 11, 2023. Go to the link below for information and to register.

What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

I was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and attended St. John Community School until Grade 7. Sports have always been a huge part of my life. In 2004 I attended Notre Dame College, located in the small southern Saskatchewan village of Wilcox. This school became my home for the next five years where I played hockey, football, and rugby, then eventually graduated high school in 2009, which was followed by a season of junior hockey in northwestern Ontario. It was in the fall of 2010 when I enrolled in first-year classes at the University of Regina. Shortly after I completed my degree, I moved to Saskatoon where I have lived for the past 6 years.

Why did you choose geoscience and what is your area of specialty?

While I was originally in the College of Engineering at U of R, it wasn’t until my second year that I took a petroleum geology class taught by Dr. Stephen Bend. It was so interesting, and I realized that I could make a career as a geoscientist. Fast forward to 2023, I have primarily worked in hard rock exploration and mining in various commodities and provinces/territories doing a range of jobs. However, the past 6 years have largely been spent working on kimberlite deposits in different developmental stages and locations, drilling and modelling ore resources.

Where and when did you study geoscience/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

I attended the U of R from 2010 until 2016, where I completed a B.Sc. in Geology as well as a Diploma in Business Administration, all while playing on the U of R Cougars rugby team. The geology program there, although a relatively small department, was of high quality and provided a respectable environment to both learn and network with classmates. It was time well spent and as a result, I made many friends that I keep in touch with to this day.

What jobs/roles have you held as a geoscientist?

Despite having many different part-time jobs during university and a stable summer job at the Co-op Refinery from 2010-2016, it wasn’t until the summer of 2016 that I began my first actual geology job with the Saskatchewan Geological Survey. I spent that summer prospecting and mapping the eastern side of Brabant Lake and Lavender Lake.

In January 2017, I had my first exposure to diamond drilling, where I was core logging for a Uranium drill program in northern Saskatchewan for Rio Tinto Exploration (RTX). The following summer I worked as an Exploration Geologist at Seabee Gold Mine where I got to experience my first helicopter-assisted prospecting and mapping campaign. Later that year, after a forest fire burnt our exploration camp, I was applying for jobs again.

As luck would have it, RTX was hiring for their newly optioned Fort à la Corne project. I couldn’t pass up an opportunity to work on a project so close to where I grew up, hearing rumours of diamonds in Saskatchewan. This project was exciting but also brought a variety of operational and technical challenges, as the new Bauer Trench Cutter was imported from Germany to bulk sample the Star Kimberlite by drilling holes 3.2 x 1.5 meters wide and up to 250m in depth.

In 2020, I would continue working with Kimberlites as I found myself flying up to the Northwest Territories to start working at the Diavik Diamond Mine. Diavik has been a rewarding experience and has had the most significant impact on my career as a geologist. I started out as an Open Pit Geologist in the A21 Pit and currently am the Underground Mine Geologist for the A154N, A154S and A21 kimberlite pipes. So far, a highlight has been the completion of the A21 Pit and the current development of the A21 underground mine where large amounts of the resource and structural work I have completed in the pit and underground has been used to design and develop the A21 underground mine.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

The thing that I have appreciated the most is the opportunities that seem to arise when you least expect them. I have been fortunate to have valuable supervisors and mentors along the way that have always offered opportunities for further career development and as a result, I have been able to have a range of unique work experiences.

Who has inspired or mentored you in your career? What insight or wisdom did they impart?

The mentors I have had so far with RTX were Tom Elash and Gus Fomradas, and at Diavik, my mentors have been Roger Young and Kari Pollock. All of them have given me many opportunities to develop and learn as a geologist to advance my career. Be willing to try new things and get out of your comfort zone.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with my fiancé, friends and family, going camping, hunting, and playing rec hockey and golf. I also enjoy fixing up older vehicles with my dad and prospecting in northern Saskatchewan.

I grew up in Humboldt, SK, and obtained my engineering degree from the University of Saskatchewan. I graduated in 1994 from Civil Engineering and then continued to do a Master’s program in Singapore at Nanyang Technological University on the topic of slope stability of unsaturated soils.

I chose engineering as my career because, like many of us, I liked to take things apart and see how they worked. I was heading down the road of electrical engineering until my first-year electricity class, which made me rethink my choices, and thankfully steered me toward civil engineering. I specialized in geotechnical engineering because, at the time I was studying, the U of S was in its prime with renowned geotechnical professors (Sauer, Wilson, Barbour, Fredlund) doing high-end geotechnical research at that time.

When I graduated, Wayne Clifton was our keynote speaker at our grad supper, and that evening was when I decided that consulting engineering was where I wanted to take my career. After completing my Master’s research in Singapore, I returned home to Saskatchewan and started working for Clifton (1999). My career has been with Clifton since that time. My positions have grown from a junior geotechnical engineer drilling and instrumenting various sites in Western Canada to Vice President of Operations, the current position I hold at Clifton.

I have been very fortunate and really appreciate the wide variety of projects I have had the opportunity to be a part of. Highlights have included the Big Dig (Wascana), Fishing Lake Floods, Belle Plaine Spur, and Regina Bypass. I had been naïve at the start of my career thinking that all the big projects and cool things had already been built and that there would be no more big projects to be a part of in Saskatchewan, but I couldn’t have been more wrong. The opportunities here at home have been fantastic.

Wayne Clifton has been the biggest inspiration throughout my career. One shiny nugget of wisdom he taught me through many of the major projects we have worked together on, is that we can design for most of the technical challenges on a project, but the bigger challenge we need to always spend time on is the clients and people. People are a very important part of every project, and it is the relationships we have with our clients and staff that require a significant amount of attention.

As a newly elected member of APEGS’ Council, I look forward to being able to give back and volunteer my service to the association that regulates our profession since it has allowed me to be who I am and work where I do. The self-regulation of our profession is not something we should take for granted, and I hope to be able to contribute to the ongoing improvements within our association, to reinforce the self-regulation of this profession for many more generations to come.

On a personal side, I live with my wife and four children in Regina. Outside of work, I enjoy spending quality time with my family outdoors, going on bike rides, travelling to airshows, and going camping. My spare time is also spent as a member of the Canadian Progress Club – Regina Centre, a community-building association founded by local businesspeople, where we host local fun events to raise funds for local children’s charities.

The Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS), the regulator of engineering and geoscience in Saskatchewan, has suspended Scott O. Gullacher, P.Eng., for 18 months, with three years of supervision thereafter.

As outlined in the final order that APEGS’ hearing panel provided to Gullacher on July 12, 2023, Gullacher’s registration to practice engineering in Saskatchewan is suspended for 18 months commencing June 8, 2022, at which time he was first ordered not to practice professional engineering. Following the 18-month suspension period, all engineering work performed by Gullacher is subject to direct supervision for three years, and Gullacher is not permitted to practice professional engineering with respect to bridges and bridge projects for five years. During the period of direct supervision, Gullacher must successfully complete five hours of verifiable ethics training each year. Gullacher is required to pay the maximum fine of $15,000 and pay $32,000 toward APEGS’ investigation costs.

Gullacher was found guilty on three counts of professional misconduct by a panel of the APEGS discipline committee as outlined in its written decision sent to Gullacher on January 24, 2023. The three counts of professional misconduct relate to the RM of Clayton’s Dyck Memorial Bridge, and five municipal bridges, one located in each of the RMs of Scott, Caledonia and Mervin and two located in the RM of Purdue.

On September 14, 2018, the Dyck Memorial Bridge collapsed. Gullacher was found to have not practiced in a careful and diligent manner by not employing a site-specific geotechnical analysis and by not providing adequate engineering designs for the helical pile foundations. The designs prepared by Gullacher for the five municipal bridges lacked relevant design information, including inaccurate representation of bridge designs, numerous Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code deficiencies, lack of critical detail on plans for welding details, among other deficiencies. This resulted in five superstructure designs which were inadequate to carry the minimum loads required by the code.

The panel’s decision and interim order as well as the final order can be found on the APEGS website under Complaints and Enforcement, Discipline Hearings & Notices.

APEGS establishes and upholds standards of professional practice and ethical conduct for the professions of engineering and geoscience in Saskatchewan. APEGS can determine that, if an engineer or geoscientist has breached the professions’ standards, it can act through a comprehensive investigation and discipline process to ensure public safety.

 

For media inquiries, contact:

Sheena August, Director of Communications and Public Relations
saugust@apegs.ca
(306) 540-3914

If you are determined to strengthen your career depth and breadth, consider gaining rich and valuable experience in the regulation of Engineers and Geoscientists in the Province of Saskatchewan.

Implementation of a future-focused business transformation strategy is underway at APEGS. Part of the transformation includes a new organizational design intended to create capacity and further develop capabilities across all functions and job levels of the Association. We are excited to seek candidates for the position of Admissions Engineer or Admissions Geoscientist as we continue to fulfill our mandate of protecting the public through regulation of the Engineering and Geoscience professions in Saskatchewan:

As an Admissions Engineer/Geoscientist, you will play a critical role in ensuring that public interests are met by confirming that engineers and geoscientists applying to be registered and licensed to practice in Saskatchewan meet the academic and experience qualifications required of a Professional Engineer (P.Eng.) or Professional Geoscientist (P.Geo.).

  • The role will rely on the provincial legislation that governs the professions of Engineering and Geoscience in Saskatchewan, together with APEGS Registration Policies and the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness, to analyze, evaluate, and formulate recommendations relative to the qualifications of applicants.
  • The Admissions Engineer/Geoscientist, Registration, provides subject matter expertise gained from a minimum of five years (preferably 6 to 10 years) post-licensure as a practicing Professional Engineer (P.Eng.) or Professional Geoscientist (P.Geo.).
  • A varied and diverse experience across various roles, functions or fields of engineering or geoscience will be considered a valued asset for this role.
  • If the opportunity to apply your diverse professional experience towards admission of qualified engineers and geoscientists into the profession resonates with you, and you are known for your keen ability to interpret, analyze, assess, evaluate, and formulate prudent recommendations, we’d like to hear from you.

See the link below for a complete description of the position, the minimum qualifications, and desired competencies.

APEGS – Admissions Engineer-Admissions Geoscientist

To Apply:

You will be joining a dedicated team that is navigating through an exciting era of business transformation within a self-regulatory framework. APEGS employees work onsite at the APEGS office in Regina. Given the nature of this role, ability for a hybrid arrangement may be considered on a case-by-case basis. In addition to an office location surrounded by too many amenities to name, APEGS offers employees a competitive salary and total rewards program which includes: Employer-paid benefits, paid vacation time, paid sick leave, an employee family assistance program, continuous learning and development opportunities, and financial support for pursuing further education or credentials. We also foster fun and comradery, including initiatives organized through our staff-led Social Committee.

Please submit a cover letter outlining how your combined experience, education and talents align with the position, together with your resume to:  hr@Apegs.ca by 5:00pm (CST) August 31, 2023.

APEGS is committed to supporting accessibility and diversity. Requests for accommodations can be made at any stage of the recruitment and selection process. If you are selected by APEGS as a candidate for the position, please make your requirements known at the time we contact you.

What is your personal background (hometown, schools, family, etc.)?

I was born in the city of Jhang in the province of Punjab, Pakistan. My dad came to Canada as a refugee when I was two. My mother, younger brother, and I rejoined my dad when we immigrated to Surrey, British Columbia when I was four. I attended several elementary schools and Enver Creek High School from grades 8-9 while we were in Surrey. When I was 16 our family moved to Warman, Saskatchewan where I finished high school and grew an interest in development (watching all of the residential development in the booming town around me), ultimately leading me to my career as a civil engineering consultant. I graduated from the University of Saskatchewan, College of Engineering with a degree in Civil Engineering.

Why did you choose engineering and what is your area of specialty?

My family moved to Warman, Saskatchewan in 2006, just as the province entered an economic boom. At the time, Warman was the fastest-growing municipality in all of Canada. This meant there was an incredible amount of residential and municipal construction all around me. As a teenager with a newly printed license, I spent countless hours exploring the new development areas around town. After grade 12, this led to my interest in pursuing an engineering degree. I am a civil engineer with a scope of practice focused on municipal infrastructure, project engineering and project management for multi-disciplinary water and wastewater treatment projects.

Where and when did you study engineering/get your degree and how would you describe your experience?

I studied engineering at the College of Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan from 2009-2013. University was a grind, but looking back, it was a time that allowed me to learn a lot about myself while also building the discipline and work ethic that continues to serve me in my career to date.

What jobs/roles have you held as an engineer?

My first exposure to the engineering professional world was as a summer student at Associated Engineering in the summers of 2011 and 2012, after my second and third years of engineering. In these summers, I gained valuable surveying, contract administration, and resident engineering experience. Following convocation in 2013, I joined Associated Engineering full-time as an engineer-in-training in our Infrastructure Division in the Saskatoon office. In the last 10 years, I’ve served in various roles ranging from a resident engineering inspector, project coordinator, project engineer, project manager, and the acting manager of Associated’s Fort McMurray office from August 2020 to March 2021. In 2019, I transferred from our Infrastructure Division to Associated’s Water Division within the Saskatoon office. This transfer allows me to use my soft skills to work with large teams of multi-discipline engineers to deliver water and wastewater projects in Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia for municipal and industrial clients.

What have you appreciated about your career opportunities and experiences?

Easily the most unexpected but most pleasant surprise about my career has been the opportunity to travel all across our province. I’ve had opportunities to spend extended periods in almost all corners of our vast province. This life experience has been invaluable in shaping me and helping me grow my communication skillset while gaining a firsthand view of the life of these beautiful communities.

Who has inspired or mentored you in your career? What insight or wisdom did they impart?

Greg Walker is a professional engineer and the group manager for Associated’s Alternate Delivery group in our Edmonton office. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to work with Greg from 2017-2020 on an Alternate Delivery project for a confidential industrial client. Somehow, Greg saw some potential in me and found a way to nurture more out of me by giving me more responsibility and freedom, while simultaneously never letting me feel “alone”. He also took his tutelage beyond the direct project work and was perhaps the first person to openly ask me what my career aspirations were. I didn’t grow up with any professionals in my family and this was a thought that was unfamiliar to me but something that allowed me to take more control of the direction of my career once I had processed it. Aside from helping me learn to steer my career in the direction I want, he taught me to give back to peers and engineers younger than myself. This was something Greg practiced himself and is a lesson that I keep close to me every day as I work with more and more people younger than me.

Why did you decide to run for council?

After a push from a dear friend and mentor, I decided to run for council as an opportunity to get more involved within the professional engineering industry while also allowing me to fulfil my desire for community service. I wanted an opportunity to serve in the regulation of our profession by offering my skillset and perspective as a councillor, while also enhancing my knowledge and awareness of the regulation of our profession, here at home in Saskatchewan, and nationally.

What activities or interests do you enjoy outside of work?

I am a husband to my amazing wife, Alia, and dad to our four-year-old daughter, Shaista and I try to spend as much of my free time with these two going for walks and travelling. I also spend a significant amount of time volunteering with the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama`at of Saskatoon in various capacities such as a youth leader and external affairs assistant.

Implementation of a future-focused business transformation strategy is underway at APEGS. Part of the transformation includes a new organizational design intended to create capacity and further develop capabilities across all functions and job levels of the association. We are excited to introduce and seek candidates for new manager-level positions that will move us forward in our continued journey of protecting the public through regulation of the Engineering and Geoscience professions in Saskatchewan.

Join our Governance & Strategy department, aimed at building and implementing programs and practices that will further strengthen our self-regulatory governance framework. You will be interested in the position of Manager, Governance if:

  • You have experience developing policy and operating practices in alignment with legislation, by-laws, and regulatory best practice.
  • You are skilled at researching and developing innovative solutions based on thought leadership and best practice, scaled to the nature, size and complexity of an organization.
  • In consultation with diverse internal and external stakeholders, you thrive on managing transition when implementing and operationalizing new or enhanced governance practices, strategic planning processes, and corporate performance management systems.
  • You gain a sense of achievement from managing corporate-wide functions that support all areas of the organization.
  • You enjoy working with and facilitating sessions for elected officials, volunteers, internal teams with diverse knowledge and expertise, as well as external third parties and service providers.

See the link below for a complete description of the position, the minimum qualifications, and desired competencies.

Manager, Governance

If you are determined to strengthen your career depth and breadth, consider gaining rich and valuable experience in the regulation of Engineers and Geoscientists in the Province of Saskatchewan.

You will be joining a dedicated team of 25 (and growing!) who are navigating through an exciting era of business transformation within a self-regulatory framework. APEGS employees work onsite at the APEGS office in Regina, with opportunities to work remotely or flex hours when needed to support work-life balance. In addition to an office location surrounded by too many amenities to name, APEGS offers employees a competitive salary and total rewards program which includes: Employer-paid benefits, paid vacation time, paid sick leave, an employee family assistance program, continuous learning and development opportunities, and financial support for pursuing further education or credentials. We also encourage fun and comradery with initiatives organized through our Social Committee.

To Apply:

Please submit a cover letter outlining how your combined experience, education and talents align with the position, together with your resume to:  hr@Apegs.ca by 5:00pm (CST) August 18, 2023

APEGS is committed to supporting accessibility and diversity. Requests for accommodations can be made at any stage of the recruitment and selection process. If you are selected by APEGS as a candidate for the position, please make your requirements known at the time we contact you.